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REVIEW: Wren #3

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REVIEW: Wren #3

Book Title: Wren #3

Book Description: “Wren” is a series that tells us about the plague in London. In the first two issues we have seen how by 1666 100,000 people lost their lives to the plague. We’ve seen plague doctors swindle their patients. We’ve seen the rich flee to the countryside, leaving the poor barricaded behind walls. The abandoned souls are going to die of plague or starvation. Christopher Wren is the engineer responsible for eradication of the plague. He’s figured out that the rats have something to do with it. This is highly controversial, as most believe that the cause is miasma. Wren’s solution is grisly but targeted and effective. He wants to burn the streets that the rats have overrun. A small handful of people will die. The majority of the rats that have made nests in the homes of the dead will be killed as well. Wren is being methodical. His observations have narrowed the affected area down to three streets. If they are razed the problem will be solved. George Monck, the Steward Wren reports to, has plans of his own. He wants to buy the properties after they have been razed. Wren doesn’t know Monck’s plan. He knows that Monck won’t be satisfied with only three streets being torched though. Wren recommends razing thirty streets in his proposal to the Royal Society. By his logic the society will say that number is too high. A compromise will be reached that will be significantly lower and still more than adequate. Monck’s double dealings leave the original proposal unchanged until it’s too late. In issue number three of “Wren” we see the effect the fire is having on the city. A lot of thought went into ensuring the fire would be contained. The people pouring the gunpowder can see Wren’s plans tell how thick the walls are. The problem is Wren didn’t measure the walls. Now all that can be done is watch and wait.

Book Author: Peter Taylor

Book Format: Paperback

Publisher - Orgnization: Pottsville Books

Publisher Logo:

Illustrator: Peter Taylor

  • Story
    (4.1)
  • Interior Art
    (3.9)
  • Cover Art
    (4.2)
  • Dialogue
    (4.1)
  • Mechanics
    (4.2)
  • Editing
    (4)
4.1

Summary

I love how this story reaches into the core of humanity. Wren knows that people will die because of his decision. He also knows not going through with his plan risks the lives of thousands. It’s a terrible moral struggle to deal with, especially if you know the people affected by your choice. 

Mr. Taylor’s story transcends the ages. Almost 400 years later we are still witnessing similar debates. We still see the battle between scientific facts and opinions. I find it both comforting and disheartening how people never change. Scientific facts that are not convenient are frowned upon in favor of something easier or more comfortable, no matter what century it is.

There aren’t enough superlatives to describe how well this cover is done. It looks like a photograph. We can see Wren’s struggle, and his disbelief in what has happened. This is the kind of artwork that draws attention to it on the shelves.

As the series has progressed we can see Mr. Taylor gets more in the zone with the artwork on the interior pages. We’re seeing more of the subtleties that bring characters to life. The little wrinkles in a forehead when someone is thinking. The creases in the corner of a mouth when someone disagrees with what is being said. It’s these little details that make it real, and Mr. Taylor is hitting it on the head.

As a geek on a budget I am all in on “Wren”. Historical fiction, drama, and humanity,  everything about this book has me wanting more. I am very anxious to see where the story will take us next.

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I grew up loving all things geek. I started reading and collecting comics when I was 8. My personal collection has roughly 8,000 books in it. When I’m not doing something geek-related I love spending time with my amazing wife and kids, gaming, and working on cross stitch projects.

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